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karim rashid speedinterview

Horeca

Okay Karim. Close your eyes. You are twelve. Where do you see yourself?What was that?Imagine yourself at twelve years old.When I was twelve? Where do I see myself? (starts laughing, but after a second..) I guess I see myself as some sort of creator when I was twelve… When I was twelve I was doing […]

Okay Karim. Close your eyes. You are twelve. Where do you see yourself?
What was that?
Imagine yourself at twelve years old.
When I was twelve? Where do I see myself? (starts laughing, but after a second..) I guess I see myself as some sort of creator when I was twelve… When I was twelve I was doing all the paintings for my highschool and running a radiostation and a newspaper…
Where was that ?
In Canada. So I was obsessed with making it happen. In a creative sense.
Where do you see yourself at that moment. Do you have your own spot.
Yeah, I guess I see myself in an auditorium.
An auditorium? At twelve years ? Okay. Let’s move on to fifteen. Highschool?
Uhmm.. I think trying to understand what part of the world I want to participate. Whether at that time it is architecture, fashion or industrial design. I think at fifteen I realised my mortality, so I found I don’t have much time left.
At that age ? And then you saw the world outside like a fifteen year old who really knew himself already?
Yah. Knew himself quite well. I felt I didn’t belong to the world. Well, I felt like I was part of some different culture, but I just didn’t feel attached to any world, nomadic.

Is that in your genes ? You are half Egyptian, half English.
In a sense yes. I am half a Jew, half English, but also the way I was brought up with a father who is an artist but also a designer. And he lived very much in the NOW, in the present. You know. And we travelled around the world. So I never felt attached to any place, or any culture, any language or any religion.

You’re in this global big world and you can go anywhere…
It’s funny. At that time the world didn’t seem at all global, but for some reason I felt like it was going to be. In 75 yeah. I felt like it was going to happen. And by the time I was 20 I started to think that we were going to have one world, that it’s going to be like Babylon… the beginning of the world starting in one place. The whole world will now be one culture.

But yet it didn’t happen…
It’s happening now (on a very soft tone of voice)… I think it’s good for everybody.

But still, in reality there are more people living in the past and the future than in the present. In the NOW.
Yeah, most people… I think we all have a tendency… I think it has something to do with the notion that we have memory that we tend to spent al lot of time in the past…

Yeah, what can you do..
Sometimes I would like to have an operation to cut that part of my memory out (points at his forehead). I don’t wanna get old and think about myself as a child.. you know what that is? That’s futile. It’s imprisonment. You’re trapped. Like Jean Paul Satre said on existentialism. You’re trapped, when you become very old all your memories will become very strong of when you were young. This is the present. And your short term memory becomes bad, but your long term memory becomes very good once you get older. I would rather have it the opposite way. I wanna remember yesterday really well. I don’t want to think about when I was twelve or fifteen. I don’t care. It’s gone. It’s too far away.

So that’s the optimum of living in the present to not see your youth as your big moment.
Ofcourse, do you know what my big moment is?
Now.
Now! Right now. Here I am talking to you. This is my big moment. Hahaha. Your questions weren’t that much about business… they were very philosophical, right?
Yeah, it´s what you said that I´m interested in: the human being. Okay, thanks for the interview… and have a nice life.
Same to you.